Monday, September 29, 2014

Appeasement

Conservatives love to vilify anyone who doesn't want to immediately throw down as "appeasers". But when you're dealing with terrorists whose aim is to bait us into overreaction, and you oblige them, aren't you the appeaser?

-- Bill Maher


This week's featured posts are "A Conservative Lexicon with English Translation" and "Classism and Corporal Punishment".

This week everybody was talking about Eric Holder


The Attorney General is retiring as soon as President Obama names and the Senate confirms a replacement. So this week was a time for retrospectives on Holder's tenure.

If you are liberal, you criticize Holder for not prosecuting fraud on Wall Street and failing to protect civil liberties against NSA snooping, but you admire his defense of voting rights against voter-suppression laws. If you're conservative, Holder is the villain of countless conspiracy theories like Fast & Furious, and you hate his defense of voting rights against voter-suppression laws.

One Holder policy is already showing results: This year the number of Americans in federal prison dropped for the first time since 1980. The U.S. incarceration rate "leads" all major nations (behind only Seychelles among countries of any sort) with 707 per 100K. Canada manages to avoid anarchy with only 118 inmates per 100K, so our rate could probably stand to come down.




If Republicans gain control of the Senate, confirming Holder's replacement could be a major headache, no matter who it is. Republicans are already raising the constitutionally bizarre idea that it would be illegitimate for the Senate to confirm Holder's replacement in the lame-duck session after the election.

Historically, cabinet appointments have been confirmed without much fanfare, unless some scandal is found in the appointee's background. Only during the Obama administration have appointments been contested in general, independent of the individual appointed. Compare, for example, President Bush's most difficult appointment: John Bolton as U. N. ambassador. Senate Democrats objected to Bolton personally, not to the idea of Bush appointing an ambassador to the U.N.

and war


The air war against ISIS expanded to Syria this week. Vox observes:
This is a huge success for Bashar al-Assad. The Syrian leader has now convinced the world's most powerful country, which was threatening to bomb him just a year ago, to instead bomb his enemies. There is a strong indication that this was his plan all along.

And we also attacked a Syrian jihadist group not previously in the headlines: Khorasan, which the administration claims is plotting attacks inside the U.S.

Consensus opinion is that ISIS can't be defeated purely from the air; somebody is going to have to provide troops. The Kurdish Peshmerga is effective fighting force in the Kurdish region of Iraq, but it remains to be seen whether they will want to advance into Kurdish regions of eastern Syria ... or what will happen if they do. Kurdish unity and independence is one of the longstanding issues of the region, and our NATO ally Turkey is firmly against it.

and the fall election


Apparently Republicans believe women vote by falling in love with a dreamy candidate, rather than by thinking about issues like men do. At least, that's the image this ad presents: a young, pretty, woman of indeterminate race who's ready to "break up" with Obama and vote against "his friends" in 2014.

Naturally, the ad was created by one man (Rick Wilson) and paid for by another (John Jordan). Because who understands women better than men do, amirite? Joan Walsh calls it "condescending" and Vox finds it "weird". I wouldn't be surprised if more liberal blogs are linking to it than conservative ones.

It's hard to imagine that any woman who isn't already anti-Obama will be swayed, but maybe that's the point. Maybe Republicans are trying to keep their already-committed women in line, lest they defect to a female senate candidate like Kay Hagan, or to a male candidate who respects them like Mark Udall.




Dr. Ben Carson hasn't formally announced yet, but he seems to be running for president. This is the kind of thoughtful commentary you can expect in the 2016 Republican primaries:
WALLACE: You said recently that there might not even be elections in 2016 because of widespread anarchy. Do you really believe that?

CARSON: I hope that that’s not going to be the case. But certainly there’s the potential because you have to recognize that we have a rapidly increasing national debt, a very unstable financial foundation, and you have all these things going on like the ISIS crisis that could very rapidly change things that are going on in our nation. And unless we begin to deal with these things in a comprehensive way and in a logical way there is no telling what could happen in just a couple of years.

Saturday, Carson finished second to Ted Cruz in the presidential straw poll at the Values Voters Summit.

and spanking


The Adrian Peterson controversy provoked me to write "Classism and Corporal Punishment".

and occasionally people have been talking about this blog


I hope someday it will seem like no big deal to notice Digby's Hullabaloo or David Brin (you'll have to scroll down some) discussing a Sift post, but that day has not yet come. I still get little chills from stuff like that.

but not nearly enough people talked about the People's Climate March


If you'd ever bought into the idea of liberal media bias, the People's Climate March should have snapped you out of it. Hundreds of thousands of people (organizers claimed 400K, but I haven't found a disinterested estimate) turned out last Sunday (the 21st), with supporting rallies in over 200 cities around the world. The network news shows that day discussed it not at all.

Imagine if the same number had showed up to demand a balanced budget or a new Benghazi investigation or something. It would have driven ISIS off the front pages.

Nothing to see here. Move along.


At least Jon Stewart talked about it, and connected it to the infuriating display of stupidity that is the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.
How far back to the elementary school core curriculum do we have to go to get someone on the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology caught up? Do we have to bring out the paper mache and the baking soda so you can make a fucking volcano? Is that what we have to do?

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPgZfhnCAdI]

and you also might be interested in ...


Another amazing John Oliver rant, this time about the Miss America Pageant.




A can't-miss interview with the Notorious RBG.


A very thought-provoking article by Ezekiel Emmanuel, the director of clinical ethics at NIH: "Why I Hope To Die at 75". He's my age (57) and in good health. He's not proposing suicide, euthanasia, or medical rationing. He's just saying that extending your life past 75 comes with an ever-increasing risk of disability, depression, or dementia.

The article has drawn a lot of my-Dad-is-89-and-doing-great comments -- and hey, look at RBG at 81 -- but that misses the point. Emmanuel thinks extended life is a bad gamble, so personally, he plans to start cutting back on medical tests and treatments as he approaches 75. If he turns out to be healthy as a horse at 90 anyway, great -- he won the lottery.

Because of Emmanuel's role in drawing up ObamaCare, his article has also draw a lot of weird we-knew-there-were-death-panels comments from the tin-foil-hat people, including the predictable National Review types, whose bizarre fantasies and nightmares often get in the way of understanding what anyone else says.




The bogus Obama "scandals" I talked about in "What Should Racism Mean?" are still happening.




I've had a soft spot in my heart for Emma Watson ever since she punched out Draco Malfoy. But her UN speech opens the door to a more mature admiration.
I want men to take up this mantle. So their daughters, sisters and mothers can be free from prejudice but also so that their sons have permission to be vulnerable and human too—reclaim those parts of themselves they abandoned and in doing so be a more true and complete version of themselves.

Then there was that whole little drama about someone threatening to release nude photos of her in revenge for that speech -- which turned out to be a hoax leading to another hoax, neither of which had anything to do with Watson.

What is the world coming to when you can't even trust the people threatening to release nude photos of celebrities? I'm reminded of the sad comment bank robber Willie Sutton made in his autobiography Where the Money Was, explaining why his accomplices kept turning him in. "You involve yourself with a very low grade of person when you become a thief." Maybe the same is true when you go looking for involuntary porn.


As a former high school newspaper editor, my sympathies are with Neshaminy High School student editor Gillian McGoldrick and her faculty supervisor, who have both been suspended over the paper's refusal to use the name of the school's team: Redskins.

The school administration is giving you a fabulous education, Gillian. The lesson they're teaching is not the one they think they're teaching, but you will value this experience for the rest of your life.

As for the faculty advisor Tara Huber: You probably knew that lesson already, but I hope it's some comfort to realize that your students will never forget you.




Two recent novels have interesting stuff to say about technology about the possibly destructive interplay between new technology and giant corporations. In The Circle by Dave Eggers, the Circle is a Google/Amazon/Apple/Facebook/Twitter combination that is idealistically trying to "complete the circle" by making all human experience available to everybody. "Privacy is theft" because it denies other people information they have a right to know. The novel recounts the narrator's gradual absorption by the cultish corporate culture, where "smiles" and "frowns" from strangers replace all genuine human relationships.

The Word Exchange by Alena Graedon examines the issue of letting corporations control access to our cultural heritage. (Picture Amazon's control of book distribution, or NetFlix' increasing monopoly on our film library.) What if a monopolistic online "word exchange" drove dictionaries to extinction? The corporation would then have an interest in seeing language change quickly, so that you'd have to look up more words. And then things get out of hand.




It's been blocked on YouTube, but you can still see Greenpeace's rising-seas version of "Everything Is Awesome", a song from The Lego Movie.




Privatization in action: The multinational corporation that bought the operating rights to the Indiana Toll Road just filed for bankruptcy. It turns out that things don't get magically more efficient as soon as government is out of the picture.




We used to say, "If we can send a man to the Moon, why can't we ... ?" Maybe the new version should be "If India can send a spacecraft to Mars for less than a billion dollars, why can't we ... ?"

and let's close with something amazing


When you watch Ana Yang perform, and then consider what she must know about the tensile strength of various liquids and the ways their bubbles behave when blown up with certain gases, it brings home the old Arthur Clarke adage: Sufficiently advanced technology really does look like magic.

Monday, September 15, 2014

Discernable Gains

Both [world] wars were fought, really, with a view to changing Germany. ... Yet, today, if one were offered the chance of having back again the Germany of 1913 -- a Germany run by conservative but relatively moderate people, no Nazis and no Communists, a vigorous Germany, united and unoccupied, full of energy and confidence, able to play a part again in the balancing-off of Russian power in Europe ... in many ways it wouldn't sound so bad, in comparison with our problems of today. Now, think what this means. When you tally up the total score of the two wars, in terms of their ostensible objective, you find that if there has been any gain at all, it's pretty hard to discern.

-- George Kennan, American Diplomacy (1951).


No Sift next week. The next articles will appear September 29.

This week's featured articles are "Infrastructure, Suburbs, and the Long Descent to Ferguson" and "Is Ray Rice's Video a Game-Changer?".

This week everybody was talking about war against the Islamic State


Look at the Kennan quote above, and think about this: If, right now, there were a secular Sunni leader who could hold Iraq together, keep the religious radicals in check, and serve as a regional counterweight to Shiite Iran, that wouldn't sound so bad.

I've just described Saddam Hussein.

That ought to make us humble about what American military power can achieve in Iraq, or Syria, or anywhere else in the Middle East. At great expense in both lives and money, we fought two wars and lost no battles. But if there has been any gain at all in the overall situation, it's pretty hard to discern.

Nonetheless, the march into a third Iraq War -- expanded to include Syria this time -- continues. In a speech Wednesday night, President Obama admitted that "we can't erase every trace of evil from the world" (an implicit criticism of President Bush), but pledged that "We will degrade, and ultimately destroy, ISIL through a comprehensive and sustained counterterrorism strategy."

And when we've done that, then will the situation be better than it was in 2002 or 1990?




For some mysterious reason, Dick Cheney is advising congressmen on what to do in Iraq, rather than testifying at his war crimes trial. Thom Hartmann:
When we, the supposed leaders of the free world, don't punish the worst political criminals in our history, it sets a terrible example for the rest of the world. ... [W]hen we do terrible things and nobody is held accountable, that gives the green light for everyone else to do the same.

Leaving aside moral considerations, the country listened to Cheney during the run-up our Iraq invasion of 2003. Pretty much every fact he told us was false, and every piece of advice he gave was wrong. Why would anyone ever listen to him again? (Except when he testifies at his trial, of course. We owe him that much.)

and Ray Rice



You can't un-see the video of Ray Rice decking his wife in the elevator. I think a lot of the men who see it are going to have a harder time explaining away future stories of domestic violence. That point gets spelled out in more detail in "Is Ray Rice's Video a Game-Changer?".

and Apple

It's amazing how much buzz surrounds the announcement of any new Apple product. Three were announced this week
  • iPhone 6, which is bigger, thinner, faster and so on, but really not that revolutionary. If you have both an iPhone 5 and an iPad mini, you might be able to replace both of them with one device.
  • Apple Watch, (I guess iWatch sounded too voyeuristic) which is promised for early 2015. It's a time-telling thing that you wear on your wrist and costs hundreds of dollars, but otherwise it clashes with all our traditional notions of an expensive watch. Previously, such a watch was an heirloom to hand down through the generations, not a gadget to replace every two or three years. It'll be interesting to see whether Apple can change that. First responses: some people like the idea, some don't.
  • Apple Pay. (Again, iPay doesn't sound right.) Someday, somebody is going to get the electronic wallet right, and that will change everything. Is this it? Maybe. Maybe not.

[full disclosure: I own Apple stock. I've tried not to let it bias me.]

but I'm still talking about Ferguson


I know, it's starting to look like an obsession. But the example of Ferguson illustrates some previously hard-to-grasp theories about how our society might decline. I connect the dots in "Infrastructure, Suburbs, and the Long Descent to Ferguson".

and you also might be interested in ...


The Senate debated a constitutional amendment to reverse the Citizens United decision and allow Congress to pass laws regulating campaign finance again. 42 Republican senators voted to filibuster, so the auction of our highest offices will continue.

It was a party-line vote. Remember that the next time a Republican senator like Susan Collins -- or any Republican candidate -- claims to be a moderate or independent-minded or something. Or when someone tells you that a Democrat like Landrieu or Manchin might as well be a Republican.

On important issues like this, the individual candidates don't matter. Only the party matters. You may wish it weren't that way, but it is.




The ObamaCare "train wreck" keeps refusing to wreck. Connecticut was supposed to be evidence of the wreck; it's second-year premiums were going to go up 12.5%. And then they went down instead. Premiums are also expected to drop in Arkansas. Costs to the federal government have been lower than expected. An update from Washington state shows that other train-wreck predictions are also failing: More people continue to sign up as they become eligible, and the number of people who stop paying their premiums has been small.

Weren't the death panels supposed to be up and running by now? What's taking so long?

The Daily Show sent a reporter out to get an ObamaCare "disaster" story, and he did indeed find someone who lost her job: a nurse in a free clinic in Tacoma, which has closed because they got all their patients signed up for insurance. The parody of media attempts to spin continuing good news as bad news is hilarious. The clinic's former patients are happy with ObamaCare, but they are "obviously biased by their personal positive experiences". When the nurse says that she has moved on to work on other important causes like human trafficking, the reporter imagines his headline: "ObamaCare Forces Nurse Into Sex Slave Trade".




From ESPN:
Nearly three in 10 former NFL players will develop at least moderate neurocognitive problems and qualify for payments under the proposed concussion settlement, according to documents filed by the league and the players. ... Former players between 50 and 59 years old develop Alzheimer's disease and dementia at rates 14 to 23 times higher than the general population of the same age range, according to the documents. The rates for players between 60-64 are as much as 35 times the rate of the general population, the documents reported.

Air Force Times reports that an atheist airman will have to sign an oath that ends "so help me God" if he wants to re-enlist. Otherwise he will have to leave the Air Force when his current term expires in November. The Air Force claims its hands are tied by Congress, which mandated the oath.

Article VI of the Constitution says:
no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.

I wonder if all those congressmen who talk so much about the Constitution and religious freedom will support changing this clear violation.




On lighter religious note: When the Rapture comes, what's going to happen to all the pets left behind? Not to worry, After the Rapture has you covered. For a one-time fee of $10, they'll add your pet to their database and promise that their Rapture-proof heathen care-givers will give him/her a good home.

Is this a joke, a scam, or a serious attempt to fill a need? Your guess is as good as mine.

and let's close with something I am never ever going to do


... skateboard the Alps.

Monday, September 8, 2014

Waves

Arabs could be swung on an idea as on a cord. ... They were incorrigibly children of the idea, feckless and colour-blind, to whom body and spirit were for ever and inevitably opposed. ... They were as unstable as water, and like water, would perhaps finally prevail. Since the dawn of life, in successive waves they had been dashing themselves against the coasts of flesh. Each wave was broken, but, like the sea, wore away ever so little of the granite on which it failed, and some day, ages yet, might roll unchecked over the place where the material world had been, and God would move upon the face of those waters. One such wave (and not the least) I raised and rolled before the breath of an idea, till it reached its crest and toppled over and fell at Damascus. The wash of that wave, thrown back by the resistance of vested things, will provide the matter of the following wave, when in the fullness of time the sea shall be raised once more.

-- Lawrence of Arabia, The Seven Pillars of Wisdom (1922)

The terrible reductive conflicts that herd people under falsely unifying rubrics like "America," "the West," or "Islam" and invent collective identities for large numbers of individuals who are actually quite diverse, cannot remain as potent as they are, and must be opposed. ... Rather than the manufactured clash of civilizations, we need to concentrate on the slow working together of cultures that overlap, borrow from each other, and live together in far more interesting ways than any abridged or inauthentic mode of understanding can allow. But for that kind of wider perception we need time, and patient and skeptical inquiry, supported by faith in communities of interpretation that are difficult to sustain in a world demanding instant action and reaction.

-- Edward Said, preface to the 2003 edition of Orientalism


This week's featured post is "Terrorist Strategy 101: a review". Maybe ISIS acts like our worst nightmare because they want us to attack them.

This week everybody was talking about ISIS


The featured post is about ISIS, and how it needs America to play the Great Satan role. But lots of other people were talking about ISIS too, like satirist Andy Borowitz:
Arguing that his motto “Don’t do stupid stuff” is not a coherent foreign policy, critics of President Obama are pressuring him to do something stupid without delay. Arizona Senator John McCain led the chorus on Tuesday, blasting Mr. Obama for failing to craft a stupid response to crises in Iraq, Syria and Ukraine. “If I were President, you can bet your bottom dollar I would have done plenty of stupid stuff by now,” McCain said.



I won't go line-by-line through the op-ed McCain and Lindsey Graham published in the NYT, because Peter Beinart already did. Short summary: McCain/Graham push President Obama to combine stuff he's already doing (but they pretend he isn't doing) with stuff beyond the power of any president. ("Any strategy ... requires an end to the conflict in Syria, and a political transition there.") Then they sprinkle in lots of what Beinart calls "happy words" like acting deliberately and urgently, and make completely unsupported pronouncements like "ISIS cannot be contained."


Conor Friedersdorf asks the kind of question hardly anybody pursues: John McCain has a long record of foreign policy pronouncements. Is he ever right? And if not, why are we still listening to him?

Friedersdorf recalls this gem, from 2003:
no one can plausibly argue that ridding the world of Saddam Hussein will not significantly improve the stability of the region and the security of American interests and values.

That's why Iraq is such a rock of stability now, because we fought what McCain called "The Right War for the Right Reasons".


Peter Beinart had a second good piece this week, in which he recalled Walter Russell Mead's four-part typology of American foreign policy views:
  • Wilsonians who export grand American visions like democracy, Christianity, or capitalism.
  • Hamiltonians who defend the international trade our economy depends on.
  • Jeffersonians who want the U.S. to stay out of international conflicts, for fear war abroad will damage liberty at home.
  • Jacksonians who avenge insults to our national honor.

Beinart attributes the recent push to crush ISIS mainly to Jacksonians, who see those YouTube beheadings as unforgivable insults. Obama's "Don't do stupid stuff" mantra is mainly anti-Jacksonian, because "honor" is the only one of four values unrelated to any pragmatic interest.




Rand Paul continues to re-affirm my opinion about him: He is a lightweight who hasn't thought through the slogans he inherited from his Dad. If he looks like a threat to win the 2016 nomination when the Republican debates begin, sharper candidates like Ted Cruz or Chris Christie will tear him apart.

A couple weeks ago on Meet the Press, Paul sounded Jeffersonian:
I think that's what scares the Democrats the most, is that in a general election, were I to run, there's gonna be a lot of independents and even some Democrats who say, "You know what? We are tired of war. We're worried that Hillary Clinton will get us involved in another Middle Eastern war, because she's so gung-ho."

A few days later, AP quoted an email Paul wrote to supporters, which pushed a more Jacksonian line:
If I were President, I would call a joint session of Congress. I would lay out the reasoning of why ISIS is a threat to our national security and seek congressional authorization to destroy ISIS militarily.

In each case, it sounded good, so he said it. There's no coherent thought process behind either statement.

and naked pictures on the internet


You would think online pictures of naked women would be old news, but this week everybody was talking about new naked pictures: Upwards of 100 celebrities had their iCloud accounts hacked, resulting in the release of nude selfies of movie star Jennifer Lawrence, supermodel Kate Upton, and other famous women.

Against my usual policy, I'm going to comment without making any effort to examine the original source material -- and no, none of the links here will get you any closer to those pictures -- because that's kind of the point. This is a violation. It's like taking pictures through a keyhole or pulling down a stranger's bikini top at the beach. ("Why did she wear something that flimsy anyway?") This time you'll almost certainly get away with it. But seriously, is that the kind of person you want to be? Lena Dunham summed it up:
Remember, when you look at these pictures you are violating these women again and again. It's not okay.



Watching the online reaction to the photos has been like lifting up a rock and seeing verminous beasties that usually stay underground. It's amazing to read all the well-don't-take-nude-pictures-then and she-shouldn't-have-trusted-the-cloud comments that appear over and over in just about every comment thread. They're like the she-was-asking-for-it response to rape.

Part of the motivation is the usual human bad-things-won't-happen-to-me-because-I'm-smarter-than-most-people thing, which lost its charm for me when my wife got cancer. But there's also an undercurrent of misogyny, and what feminists call "the rape culture": the idea that women exist for men's amusement, and that once a woman has made any concession to male voyeurism, she's abandoned her right to draw a line anywhere.

Salon's Andrew Leonard and Jezebel's Mark Shrayber have collected and commented on the outrage expressed on Reddit as the site tries to restrict distribution of the photos. Some men apparently believe that if naked photos exist anywhere, they have a God-given right to see them.


Slate's Emily Bazelon makes a good legal point:
Every day, movie and TV producers succeed in getting videos that have been posted without their consent taken down from major websites. ... Yet in the days since Jennifer Lawrence and other celebrities discovered that their nude images were stolen, and then posted without their consent on sites like Reddit and 4Chan, the stars can’t get the images taken down. ... This is crazy. Why should it be easy to take down Guardians of the Galaxy and impossible to delete stolen nude photos?

Answer: Because Congress' top priority is protecting corporate profits. As with so many issues, the trail leads back to campaign finance reform.




Included in the release are pictures of Olympic gymnast McKayla Maroney taken when she was under 18, so under the law they're child pornography. You really, really don't want them found on your hard drive.




For what it's worth, Apple says it's not their fault: Hackers brute-forced the passwords on the accounts rather taking advantage of some Apple software flaw. But they have announced new features to warn you when there are signs your account has been hacked. ("Here is a photo of your horse running away. Would you like to shut the stable door now?")




And finally, if you want to see racy pictures of Kate Upton, Sports Illustrated has gobs of them. They're shot in exotic locations by world-class photographers, and some of them are pretty hot. And here's the best part: Kate consented to have them published. So the only point in looking instead at pictures she wanted to keep private is to violate her privacy. If violation and lack of consent make pictures sexier to you, you need to have a long conversation with yourself.

and Governor Ultrasound's guilt


Ex-Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell was found guilty of corruption, and his wife was convicted as a co-conspirator. Rachel Maddow was the first national-news pundit to take this story seriously, and has been on it ever since, so her coverage of the verdict includes the most background.
Who he was and how he became governor in the first place was through the televangelist, hard-core, social conservative, family values power structure, in which he promised us that he would be the man to save marriage in Virginia, that his personal family values would become the public policy of the state of Virginia. He would remake the state's Christian morality in the image of his own Christian family and his own Christian marriage.

McDonnell's defense turned all that upside-down. Under the law, his wife wasn't a public official, so she could only be an accomplice to corruption; if he wasn't guilty, she couldn't be. So the defense was that it was all her fault. She was the one who solicited gifts from a Virginia businessman and implied he would get something from the governor in exchange. And their relationship was so strained they were incapable of conspiring.

Reportedly, McDonnell had previously turned down a plea-bargain deal that would have avoided a trial, kept his wife out of jail, and convicted him of only one count. Amanda Marcotte draws the lesson:
McDonnell has dedicated his career to the idea that women should sacrifice everything for the good of “family,” including bodily autonomy and personal safety, but the second he’s called upon to take on the responsibility of a good Christian husband to protect his wife, he ran away and tried to foist as much as the blame as he could on her. Turns out family values wasn’t about men and women sacrificing together for family, just a cover story to excuse male dominance over women.

and Democrats letting Independents carry the ball against right-wingers


Two similarly odd stories this week: Democrats withdrawing from a race so that an independent would have a chance to defeat a far-right Republican.

In Alaska, Democratic gubernatorial nominee Byron Mallott announced he and independent Bill Walker would form a unity ticket against Republican incumbent Gov. Sean Parnell. Walker will get the top spot and Mallott will run for lieutenant governor. Hard to say if this maneuver will work: Parnell had a 42%/42% approval/disapproval rating in a recent poll, and was winning the three-way race with only 37% support. I haven't seen any post-announcement one-on-one polling of the Parnell/Walker race.

In the Kansas Senate race, Democratic nominee Chad Taylor announced he was dropping out of the race in favor of independent Greg Orman in their race against Republican incumbent Pat Roberts. But Republican Secretary of State Kris Kobach (already famous for his voter suppression efforts) says Taylor's name will have to stay on the ballot.

Again, it's hard to say if this will work, whether Taylor stays on the ballot (but doesn't campaign) or not. Nate Silver is skeptical of a pre-announcement poll that said Orman would win a head-to-head race, but he doesn't pretend to know that anything else will happen either.

Also unknown is what Orman would do if his vote were the difference between Harry Reid or Mitch McConnell becoming majority leader. If his vote is decisive, he promises only to "sit down with both parties and have a real frank discussion about the agenda they want to follow."

If I were Orman, I'd start answering that question with a complete fantasy: "I'll organize a controlling bloc of moderate senators on each side who are sick of gridlock and want to get something done."

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New stuff about the Michael Brown shooting. Two new witnesses tell a familiar story: Brown had his hands up and wasn't endangering Darren Wilson.
No witness has ever publicly claimed that Brown charged at Wilson. The worker interviewed by the Post-Dispatch disputed claims by Wilson’s defenders that Brown was running full speed at the officer.

“I don’t know if he was going after him or if he was falling down to die,” he said. “It wasn’t a bull rush.”

Also, the Ferguson police chief was lying about why he released the surveillance tape that seemed to show Michael Brown stealing cigars from a convenience store. Chief Thomas Jackson said he had to release the tape, because reporters had made FOIA requests for it. The Blot reports:
a review of open records requests sent to the Ferguson Police Department found that no news organization, reporter or individual specifically sought the release of the surveillance tape before police distributed it on Aug. 15.

Last month, TheBlot Magazine requested a copy of all open records requests made by members of the public — including journalists and news organizations — that specifically sought the release of the convenience store surveillance video. The logs, which were itself obtained under Missouri’s open records law, show only one journalist — Joel Currier with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch — broadly requested any and all multimedia evidence “leading up to” Brown’s death on Aug. 9.

Other records that would have been subject to Currier’s request, including 9-1-1 call recordings and police dispatch tapes, have yet to be formally released by the agency.

So the release was part of an intentional smear of Michael Brown, which Chief Jackson covered up by lying. Makes you wonder what else the Ferguson police have lied about.




NYC Police probably didn't know Chaumtoli Huq was a human-rights lawyer when they arrested her for standing outside the restaurant where her husband and kids were using the bathroom. They just knew she was a dark-complexioned person near a pro-Palestine rally.




Guess what? When your political system is based on money, foreign money has a vote. Sunday's NYT exposed how money from foreign governments influences think tanks whose research wields considerable influence in Congress.
As a result, policy makers who rely on think tanks are often unaware of the role of foreign governments in funding the research.



The WaPo's "The Fix" blog disagrees with my assessment of Hillary Clinton's statement on Ferguson (from last week), finding it "surprisingly bold" and "among the most substantive".


NY Review of Books' article "The Dying Russians" is both fascinating and horrifying. For decades, Russia has simultaneously had a low birth rate and an inexplicably high death rate. So it's de-populating in a way that has never been seen in peacetime absent some major plague.
Another major clue to the psychological nature of the Russian disease is the fact that the two brief breaks in the downward spiral coincided not with periods of greater prosperity but with periods, for lack of a more data-driven description, of greater hope.



Tuesday at Idaho State, an armed professor shot himself in the foot during class. Is this a great idea or what? That was on the sixth day of class. How long before one of these bozos kills somebody?

Meanwhile, in the I-can't-believe-we're-even-debating-this department, a gun control group is trying to get Kroger to take a stand against openly carrying firearms into its grocery stores.




Fast food workers -- from McDonald's, Burger King, Wendy's and KFC -- demonstrated for higher wages and a union in several cities Thursday.




After years carrying water for Wall Street interests, Eric Cantor now has a $2-million-a-year job for an investment bank. It makes you understand why congresspeople have no fear of the voters.




The Obama executive orders on immigration we've been expecting ... well, wait until after the election.
Obama faced competing pressures from immigration advocacy groups that wanted prompt action and from Democrats worried that acting now would energize Republican opposition against vulnerable Senate Democrats. Among those considered most at risk were Democratic Sens. Mark Pryor of Arkansas, Mary Landrieu of Louisiana and Kay Hagan of North Carolina. ... White House officials said aides realized that if Obama's immigration action was deemed responsible for Democratic losses this year, it could hurt any attempt to pass a broad overhaul later on.

and let's close with a map that shows our real divisions

Monday, September 1, 2014

Normal Behavior

Is [St. Louis County] particularly bad in terms of the quotient of police officers who act like this? Or is this just normal, and we just happened to have the cameras pointed there?

-- Chris Hayes


This week's featured post is "5 Lessons to Remember as Ferguson Fades into History". Last week's featured post "What Your Fox-Watching Uncle Doesn't Get About Ferguson" was popular, getting over 7,500 page views. August as a whole was the highest-traffic month in Sift history, with 163K views -- most of them for "Not a Tea Party, a Confederate Party".

This week everybody was talking about police and black people


At least on the liberal side of the media, incidents where innocent blacks are harassed or otherwise mistreated by police are starting to be covered as a pattern, rather than as isolated events that may not be newsworthy on their own. That's one of the topics discussed in "5 Lessons to Remember as Ferguson Fades into History".

If you like the Norman Rockwell parody in that post, here's a higher-art-quality version of the same idea.


Salon examines how a totally false "fact" -- that Michael Brown fractured Officer Wilson's eye socket -- spread from a conspiracy-theory web site all the way to the Washington Post, without anybody bothering to check it until after it was national news.

and sexual harassment in the Senate

New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand has a new book coming out, and what everyone wants to talk about is her account of rude sexist interactions with male senators. (I suspect those take up a fairly small portion of the book.) Like this one recounted in The New York Post:
one of her favorite older senators walked up behind her, squeezed her waist, and intoned: “Don’t lose too much weight now. I like my girls chubby.”
Politico's John Bresnahan tweeted:
I challenge this story. Sorry, I don't believe it.

But female journalists were far from shocked. MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell sounded like Casablanca's Captain Renault.
Men behaving badly on Capitol Hill? What a surprise.

and Market Basket


If you want a feel-good story for Labor Day, this is it. Workers and customers got together and fired management. It required a billion-dollar deal to buy out his cousin's controlling interest, but Artie T is back in charge. Lawrence O'Donnell (who clearly enjoyed his chance to drop some R's, i.e. "Mahket Basket", "Ahty T" ) drew the lesson:
How many workers in America would do that? Go on strike because their very rich CEO was pushed out in a family feud power play? ... That's what it takes to be a beloved CEO: exactly what you think it would take. Pay well, know employees by name, care about them, talk to them, know what they want and what they need to do a better job.

Until these last six weeks I hadn't realized that any of the local grocery chains treated workers better than the others, so I usually went to whichever store I happened to be passing when I realized I wanted something. But I stayed away from MB during the controversy, and observed that all the other stores were crowded with people who were also avoiding Market Basket. Now that the fight is over, Market Basket has won my loyalty.

and you also might be interested in ...


AlterNet and DailyKos offer a precise estimate of the danger ISIS terrorists pose to U.S. cities: Zero.
How likely is it that a genuine ISIS cell is hiding in the United States lining up, let's say, zeppelins of death right now? Very, very, very unlikely. So unlikely that even planning for it would prove we're the ones who are insane.



So what are the odds that Republicans will eventually join Democrats in backing a carbon tax, which could both fight global warming and replace taxes they hate more? Also zero. Grist's Ben Adler is "sorry to burst your bubble". But Republicans won't support a carbon tax until they start accepting science, which they show no signs of doing.




Follow up to my comment about Hillary Clinton two weeks ago: Clinton's tepid response to the Michael Brown shooting and the Ferguson protests hasn't reassured me about her potential candidacy. It took until Thursday -- 18 days after the shooting -- for her to say anything, and then her comments had a little something for everybody.

Everybody sympathizes at some level with the Brown family, so Clinton started there: "my heart just broke for his family because losing a child is every parent's greatest fear and an unimaginable loss." Like everybody, she wants a "thorough and speedy investigation". On the violence, she said: "This is what happens when the bonds of trust and respect that hold any community together fray. Nobody wants to see our streets look like a war zone."

And that's the problem: She's criticizing Nobody. Whether you think police over-reacted or that their military response was appropriate in the face of black violence, she's with you. It's a tragedy; no one is to blame.

And even in the part of her remarks most sensitive to the black experience, she identified we with whites. OK, she was at a tech conference and the audience was probably pretty pale, but still:
Imagine what we would feel, what we would do if white drivers were three times as likely to be searched by police at a traffic stop as black drivers, instead of the other way around. If white offenders received prison sentences 10 percent longer … if a third of all white men — look at this room, take one third — went to prison during their lifetime. Imagine that.

Here's what I'm imagining: A Democratic candidate who promotes Democratic ideals. One big advantage Republicans have had the last few decades is that in every election, their candidates tell the voters why they should embrace the conservative worldview. Democratic candidates typically "move to the center", with the result that many voters never hear an empassioned liberal message.

I take Elizabeth Warren seriously when she says she won't run and supports Clinton. Bernie Sanders is thinking about running. I love Bernie, but truthfully, I hope someone younger and cooler will carry the progressive flag.


This graph summarizes Pew Research polls about the views of members of various religious groups. It reminds me why I'm a Unitarian Universalist. Can the Anglicans really be that economically conservative? And the UCC, where Jeremiah Wright preaches?

We need a word for ...

the sense of frustration you feel when you can't join a boycott, because you never use that product anyway. Burger King is buying Tim Horton's so that it can become a Canadian company and stop paying U. S. taxes. Good luck selling burgers to all those Canadian tourists, because patriotic Americans should stop buying them. Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown suggests two alternatives:
Burger King’s decision to abandon the United States means consumers should turn to Wendy’s Old Fashioned Hamburgers or White Castle sliders. Burger King has always said ‘Have it Your Way’; well my way is to support two Ohio companies that haven’t abandoned their country or customers.

Unfortunately, the loss of my business is not going to do BK much damage.

Let's close with some feminism in an unexpected place


Namely, country and western music. Maddie and Tae want guys to know what it's like to be "The Girl in the Country Song", so they made a role-reversing video.

And Kira Isabella gets serious about date rape in "Quarterback".

Monday, August 25, 2014

Unwarranted

Ferguson is a city located in northern St. Louis County with 21,203 residents living in 8,192 households. ... Despite Ferguson’s relative poverty, fines and court fees comprise the second largest source of revenue for the city, a total of $2,635,400. In 2013, the Ferguson Municipal Court disposed of 24,532 warrants and 12,018 cases, or about 3 warrants and 1.5 cases per household.

-- Arch City Defenders, "Municipal Courts White Paper"

This week's featured post is "What Your Fox-Watching Uncle Doesn't Get About Ferguson". The featured post from two weeks ago "Not a Tea Party, a Confederate Party" continued its viral spread last week. It's now over 100,000 page views, making it the second most popular Sift post ever. But it's still got a ways to go to catch "The Distress of the Privileged" at 332K. (Those numbers make the 2,000 views of last week's "The Ferguson Test" seems puny, but it's actually quite good by normal Weekly Sift standards.)

This week everybody was still talking about Ferguson


Wednesday, MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell nailed the NYT for police reporting that reminds me of the reporting Judith Miller did for them in the lead-up to the Iraq War: Leaks from government sources are reported as facts, the official framing of events is accepted uncritically, and contradictory evidence is discounted.


A different angle on Ferguson comes from Arch City Defenders, a group that "strives to provide holistic criminal and civil legal services to the homeless and working poor in the St. Louis Region."

In a white paper on the St. Louis area municipal courts published before Mike Brown's death, ACD focused on Ferguson and two other municipalities that it described as "chronic offenders" for abuses of the justice system like
being jailed for the inability to pay fines, losing jobs and housing as result of the incarceration, being refused access to the Courts if they were with their children or other family members, and being mistreated by the bailiffs, prosecutors, clerks and judges in the courts.

... In many municipalities, individuals who are unable to pay whatever fines they are assessed are incarcerated — sometimes repeatedly over many years. One defendant described being incarcerated fifteen or sixteen times over a decade on the same municipal charge.

In short, if you are poor in Ferguson, getting a speeding ticket can wreck your life. But it makes money for the town.
Court costs and fines represent a significant source of income for these towns. According to the St. Louis County two municipalities alone, Ferguson and Florissant, earned a combined net profit of $3.5 million off of their municipal courts in 2013.
ACD's Thomas Harvey says:
The courts in those municipalities are profit-seeking entities that systematically enforce municipal ordinance violations in a way that disproportionately impacts the indigent and communities of color.

St. Louis Couty municipal courts typically don't provide public defenders, so even if the law makes allowance for poverty, the poor may not know how to claim their rights. Those who can afford lawyers often can deal with minor violations without a court appearance, with the result that (as one resident put it) "You go to all of these damn courts, and there’s no white people."

ACD's white paper draws an obvious conclusion: "This interaction ... shapes public perception of justice and the American legal system."




St. Louis police released a cellphone video of two of their officers killing a different black man. The video contradicts several parts of the police account of the killing, but nonetheless the shooting is judged by experts to be justified. Watching it gives you some idea of what police are allowed to get away with.




Three of the officers involved in policing the Ferguson protests have been disciplined. The first was Ray Albers of the St. Ann police force, who was videotaped waving a gun at the crowd and yelling, "I will fucking kill you." He's been suspended indefinitely.

The second is Glendale officer Matthew Pappert, who was suspended after tweeting: "These protestors should have been put down like a rabid dog the first night."

But the scariest is Dan Page of the St. Louis force. He's been relieved of duty after St. Louis Post-Dispatch released a video of an hour-long talk he gave to a meeting of the local Oath Keepers chapter in April. The articles about him pick out the easy sound bites: his hostility to gays, women, the Supreme Court, and President Obama, as well as several statements expressing pride in being "a killer". But if you watch the whole talk, what's really frightening is Page's paranoid thought process, and the fact that the gym-full of people he appears to be talking to seem to approve.

I have listened to certifiably paranoid people before, and this talk is exactly what they sound like. They present "evidence" for their dark fantasies that you look at and think "Huh?" Page wanders through the Constitution, the Bible, the Declaration of Independence, and various other apparently authoritative sources, referencing bits that (if you look them up) have little to do with what he's saying. (At the 25 minute mark: "In Psalms 83, Russia invades Israel. They are beat back, eight-fifths of their army are killed.")

At around the 17-minute mark he presents a slide he says came from a talk by the Secretary of the Army. The untitled, unannotated slide is simply a list of ten regions. ("1. America, Canada, Mexico ... 10. Remainder of Africa".) Page finds this slide deeply threatening: "World government, folks. Anybody who resists it is dead."

The idea that Dan Page is on the street with a gun is scary enough, much less that he has wielded the authority of a police officer for 35 years.




Online arguments about the Brown shooting are so formulaic that The Daily Dot has a taxonomy of the ten kinds of trolls you'll run into.




As part of a long article that is well worth reading end-to-end, an ex-cop compares Ferguson to the Bundy Ranch showdown.
On the Bundy Ranch, armed protesters were violently obstructing law enforcement from performing their duties. Sniper rifles were pointed at those law enforcement officers. Then those “snipers” openly gloated about how they had the agents in their sights the entire time. And what was the police response? All out retreat. Nobody was arrested. No tear gas deployed. No tanks were called in. No Snipers posted in the neighborhood. No rubber bullets fired. Nothing. Police officers in mortal danger met with heavily armed resistance and no one had to answer for it.

... Just imagine if there were 150 black folks walking around Ferguson with assault rifles right now. Imagine if a couple of them took up sniper positions on the tops of buildings with their rifles pointed at the police officers. Take a quick guess at how that story ends.

and ISIS


The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria beheaded American journalist James Foley -- and posted the video on YouTube -- after the U.S. government refused a 100 million Euro ransom demand and a rescue attempt failed. This sparked a lot of discussion about widening the U.S. involvement in Iraq beyond the current air strikes.

I don't doubt that a lot of people in ISIS are bad guys. But it gets old watching the pro-war spin machine work. Once again, we face a group of insane, unstoppable monsters far worse than the last group of insane, unstoppable monsters we were warned about. Rick Perry thinks they're coming over the Mexican border, and a former CIA deputy director warns us that they could get an AK-47 and shoot up a mall -- not because either man has any evidence that such things are in the process of happening, but because we have a new name for the Boogie Man.

The problem with the panic-mongering is that it just raises the pressure to do something. It doesn't increase the effectiveness of any of the somethings we might do. Couldn't we someday have a rational discussion of what our options really are, and what good or bad things are likely to result from the various things we might do?

and Ukraine/Russia


The Ukrainian government forces seem to be advancing against the pro-Russian rebels who hold several cities near the Russian border. Russia is moving what it claims is humanitarian aid across the border, but Ukraine says it's military re-supply for the rebels. It's hard for American journalists to verify anybody's story.

and you also might be interested in ...


It's still in the laboratory (at my alma mater, BTW), but wow is this cool: transparent solar cells. Someday, your windows could generate electricity without blocking the view.




The pressure to change the name of the Washington NFL team continues its slow, inexorable build. The editorial board of The Washington Post announced Friday that it will no longer refer to the team as "Redskins" in its editorials. (Presumably, the announcement itself was the last time.) That move was mostly symbolic, since the R-team isn't mentioned that often on the editorial page, and the news and sports sections of the paper will continue to print "Redskins". But it's something.

As of June, The Seattle Times won't use the name at all. It'll be interesting to see how they cover the Seattle-Washington Monday Night Football game on October 6. Maybe this article from The Kansas City Star could be a model.

Wednesday it came out that longtime NFL referee Mike Carey had been quietly boycotting Washington games since 2006. When confronted with the fact that he had not refereed a Washington game in many years, Carey owned up:
The league respectfully honored my request not to officiate Washington. ... It just became clear to me that to be in the middle of the field, where something disrespectful is happening, was probably not the best thing for me.

Carey has retired from the NFL and now works for CBS' football coverage team as a rules analyst. He was the first African-American to referee a Super Bowl. A coaches' poll once named him (tied with another guy) as the league's best referee.

CBS' Phil Simms and NBC's Tony Dungy have said they will try to avoid saying "Redskins" while announcing or commenting on games.

Sooner or later, these little grains of sand will turn into a landslide. For now, not cooperating with the misnamed team requires an explanation. But we're approaching a tipping point, where those who do cooperate will be expected to explain.

and let's close with some creative law-breaking

Cracked has compiled a list of "The 7 Most Badass Acts of Vandalism Ever Photographed". I mean, would you have thought to paint a giant penis on a drawbridge, so that would rise every time the bridge goes up? Or turn a Soviet monument in Bulgaria into colorful American comic-book characters and other mythical beings like Santa Claus and Ronald McDonald? Or let half a million brightly colored plastic balls bounce down the Spanish Steps in Rome? Somebody did.

Monday, August 18, 2014

Conditioning

As a white person in the U.S., I am conditioned from birth to see whiteness as safety -- white neighborhoods, white people, white authority figures. My lived experience, my conversations with people of color, and my study of history have shown me over and over that this is a wild and cruel perversion of the truth. But the cultural conditioning is strong. Unless I fight it every day, white superiority seeps into my brain in slow, almost undetectable ways.

-- Rev. Meg Riley, "Up to Our Necks"


Last week's "Not a Tea Party, a Confederate Party" had the hottest first week in Weekly Sift history, with over 62,000 hits so far. It has slowed down a little, but is still getting thousands a day. Already it's the third most popular Sift post ever.

This week's featured article is "The Ferguson Test". Rather than focus on breaking news (something a one-man weekly blog can't hope to do well) this post asks you to take a step back and examine your own reactions to Ferguson. How is race influencing the way you perceive the facts?

This week everybody was talking about the Ferguson protests


Very short version, for people who have been cut off from civilization all week: A young black man was shot by police under suspicious circumstances in a mostly-black suburb of St. Louis. The police stonewalled (but the family has released its own autopsy), the community protested (mostly peacefully, but with violent incidents), and the local police responded with military weapons and tactics until Governor Jay Nixon put the state police in charge, which temporarily calmed things down. Over the weekend, things heated up again and now the National Guard has been called in.

To get a handle on this, the continuously updated Vox card stack "Everything you need to know about the Ferguson, MO protests for Michael Brown" is a good place to start. The NYT has a day-by-day timeline. But maybe nobody does a better job of pulling it all together than John Oliver.

Here's the thing the [Ferguson] mayor doesn't understand. As a general rule, no one should ever be allowed to say, "There is no history of racial tension here." Because that sentence has never been true anywhere on Earth.

And he responds to Governor Nixon's scolding of the community (with the "profoundly patronizing" tone of "a pissed-off vice principal trying to restore order at an assembly") by turning it around.
That should go both ways. I know the police love their ridiculous unnecessary military equipment. So here's another patronizing test: Let's take it all away from them. And if they can make it through a whole month without killing a single unarmed black man, then (and only then) can they get their fucking toys back.

Articles about Ferguson have explored several inter-related issues.

The specifics of the Brown shooting. See the above-mentioned Vox card stack. And an editorial in The St. Louis American gives some important political and economic background. In an era where downtowns are gentrifying, the poor are increasingly ending up in the first ring of suburbs, in places like Ferguson. But as whites flee to the more distant suburbs or return to the city, the white-dominated political power structure is often the last thing to go.

Racism in policing and the justice system. Ezra Klein's article puts this together well.

Officer Friendly has changed.

The militarization of police in American cities. Due to a program that distributes unneeded military equipment to local police forces, towns as small as Franklin, Indiana now have the kind of mine-resistant personnel carriers that even the Army didn't have in the early days of the Iraq occupation. And John Oliver's rant (above) makes fun of Keene, New Hampshire's suggestion that such a vehicle might be needed if terrorists strike the annual fall Pumpkin Festival (which I've been to and survived without incident).



The problem? Clothes make the man. If you see the public out the window of an armored vehicle, they don't look the way they might if you were walking among them. And they don't look at you the same, either. Worse, military veterans trained in this kind of hostile crowd control tell us that the Ferguson police are doing it wrong.

Andrew Exum tweeted:
Ferguson is useful in that it separates those who actually worry about the power of the state from those who just hate Obama and want to wave a Gadsden Flag around with their friends.

Michael Bell is a white retired Air Force officer whose article: "What I Did After Police Killed My Son" raises a more general question of police accountability.
In 129 years since police and fire commissions were created in the state of Wisconsin, we could not find a single ruling by a police department, an inquest or a police commission that a shooting was unjustified. ... The problem over many decades, in other words, was a near-total lack of accountability for wrongdoing; and if police on duty believe they can get away with almost anything, they will act accordingly.

and Robin Williams


who apparently committed suicide last Monday. There were three types of articles about him:
  • news articles about his suicide, most of which have been blessedly short on details. Like most of the public, I often compulsively seek out details and then wish I didn't know them. A late-breaking detail was that he was suffering some early Parkinson's symptoms.
  • tributes to his career, which had amazing breadth. I saw him live only once, at a benefit in Boston that he did for John Kerry's Senate campaign. (I think in 1990.) I can't remember a single word he said, but it was brilliant.
  • discussions of depression, which have ranged from clueless to extremely interesting. I got the most insight out of David Wong's "Robin Williams and Why Funny People Kill Themselves".
Lynn Ungar points out that the Ferguson and Williams stories have something in common: They both offer us the choice of whether to try to understand people in distress or stand in judgment over them. Both stories have an element of "if you haven’t been there, you don’t know."

I have a personal interest in depression. Both of my parents had age-related depression in their later years, and (from the early warning signs) I suspect I will too. Among other things, the brain is an organ that processes neurotransmitters, like a big kidney that also happens to think. Like many people's kidneys, it may do its job less and less well as it ages.

The biggest thing people don't get about depression is that when you're depressed, your brain is broken. (I think the TV show Homeland has done a brilliant job of showing how a person struggles to think when she knows her brain is broken. Carrie suffers from mania, which is a different malfunction, but many of the same principles apply.) Paying attention to your stream of emotions is like listening to a radio mystery during an electrical storm; bursts of static wipe out key details, other programs bleed in, and you struggle to hang on to the story you tuned in for.

In spite of mirror neurons and empathy and all that, you can never really know what's going on in another person's brain, even if both of you are icons of mental health. When malfunctions start to cloud the picture, we're all just guessing. So I find it impossible to stand in judgment of Robin Williams, either to condemn him or grant him absolution. I have no idea what it was like to be in his head.




In any other week, the death of Lauren Bacall would have been the top entertainment-news story. She was not just a great actress in her own right, but because she came of age as the old Hollywood system was ending and lived to be 89, her death marks the passing of a generation.

and Hillary Clinton


In an interview with The Atlantic's Jeffrey Goldberg, Clinton began the process of distancing herself from President Obama, apparently in preparation for a 2016 presidential run. The most-quoted parts of that interview criticize Obama's handling of Syria:
The failure to help build up a credible fighting force of the people who were the originators of the protests against Assad—there were Islamists, there were secularists, there was everything in the middle—the failure to do that left a big vacuum, which the jihadists have now filled

and his cautious approach to intervention in general:
Great nations need organizing principles, and ‘Don’t do stupid stuff’ is not an organizing principle.

As James Fallows points out, most of her interview stayed in harmony with Obama's policies; but she should have known that the headlines would be about the differences.

If the former interpretation is right, Clinton is rustier at dealing with the press than we assumed. Rustier in taking care with what she says, rustier in taking several days before countering a (presumably) undesired interpretation. I hope she's just rusty. Because if she intended this, my heart sinks. ... Yeah, we should have “done something” in Syria to prevent the rise of ISIS. But the U.S. did a hell of a lot of somethings in Iraq over the past decade, with a lot more leverage that it could possibly have had in Syria. And the result of the somethings in Iraq was … ?


Fahred Zakaria critiques "The Fantasy of Middle Eastern Moderates".
Asserting that the moderates in Syria could win is not tough foreign policy talk, it is a naive fantasy with dangerous consequences.

I've been resisting writing about 2016, because I think it's a too-easy way to fill space with speculation that sounds a lot more important than it is. But these days a serious presidential campaign is a nationwide, multi-million-dollar enterprise that can't be thrown together at the last minute. So we're approaching the first big decision point: Who's going to run? Clinton is the obvious front-runner, so the question is: If she runs, will any Democrat mount a serious challenge? And should liberals be hoping someone does, or not?

Up until this week, I've been focused on the importance of the Democrats hanging on to the White House, so I've been OK with Hillary going mostly unchallenged. If you're focused on winning in November, you want the primaries to be like preseason football: Your team gets to run through its plays in a game-like situation, but faces no consequential threat. And you don't want what the Republicans are shaping up to have: a big mudfest that someone wins by pandering to the party's least attractive elements, and saying a lot of things that will come back to haunt him/her in the fall.

But the Goldberg interview reminded me of what I've long disliked about both the Clintons: Everything seems so calculated. I'm not sure whether there's a real worldview in there, or just a political strategy. Bill's two terms were a mixed bag. By preventing a Bush re-election, he gave us Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court rather than another Clarence Thomas. But after eight years spent constantly trying to find the center, the question, "What is the Democratic Party about?" seemed hopelessly muddled.

Here's what I fear Hillary is thinking: If liberal votes can be taken for granted, then the best message for convincing swing voters is probably: "I'm tougher than Obama." Tougher on Muslims, tougher on controlling the border, tougher on violence on our city streets. But if that message wins, where can she go with it?




And what if America is moving left, like Thomas Ricks?

and you also might be interested in ...

Rick Perry got indicted for abuse of power, but I'm having a hard time getting excited about it. Steve Kornacki is skeptical and Jonathan Chait thinks it's "unbelievably ridiculous". They're not Perry's usual defenders.


Google just got a little creepier. Here's a map of a smartphone user's wanderings.




Kentucky's proposed "Ark Encounter" theme park wants to get state subsidies while only hiring fundamentalist Christians.

and let's close with something America should envy

Copenhagen's "Cycle Snake", a beautiful new elevated bikeway.

Monday, August 11, 2014

Overwhelming Threats

The court finds that even those doctors who support abortion, who have training in abortion, and who would be willing to withstand the professional consequences of performing abortion would not agree to perform abortions because the threat of physical violence and harassment is so overwhelming.

-- Judge Myron Thompson of the U.S. court for the middle district of Alabama (8/4/2014)

terrorism, noun: The use of violence and intimidation in the pursuit of political aims. -- Oxford Dictionaries


This week's featured post is "Not a Tea Party, a Confederate Party". It's the culmination of nearly two years of reading. A more accurate view of key points in American history can change how you see today's politics.

This week everybody was talking about Iraq


President Obama authorized the first American air strikes since our combat mission in Iraq ended. Vox explains what's going on. And on Last Week Tonight, John Oliver nailed Obama's reluctant tone when he announced the strikes: "The President sounds a lot like a girl who is trying to reassure her friends that she is not getting back together with the ex-boyfriend they all hate."

and two abortion rulings in the South


In July, a federal appeals court in Mississippi upheld an injunction that prevents a new Mississippi regulation from closing the last abortion clinic in the state. The State had argued that abortions were still available in neighboring states easily reachable by car. But the court held: "Mississippi may not shift its obligation to respect the established constitutional rights of its citizens to another state."

Last Monday, a federal district court in Alabama ruled on a similar regulation in that state: Doctors in abortion clinics are required to have admitting privileges with local hospitals. This is expected to close 3 of Alabama's 5 abortion clinics. Judge Thompson's ruling (that the regulation puts an undue burden on Alabama women's right to choose an abortion) does an extraordinary job of laying out the full picture of what may superficially seem like a reasonable regulation.

It boils down to this: The history of violence against abortionists in Alabama, and the continuing harassment and intimidation of doctors and their patients, makes it unsafe for an abortion-clinic doctor to live in large parts of Alabama. In the three clinics likely to close, most doctors have their primary practice and residence elsewhere. (One doctor drives to the clinic from another state, using a diverse series of rentals cars rather than his own car, in hopes that he won't be spotted by potential assassins.) That lack of local presence makes them ineligible for admitting privileges at local hospitals. The clinics could stay open if they could recruit new doctors who live and practice nearby, but that is impossible because they would not be safe.

The Alabama legislature, of course, knows all this. (So does the Mississippi legislature. And Texas.) The purpose of these regulations isn't to improve care, but to shut down the clinics. And (if the courts allow it) it will work because the legislature's strategy fits hand-in-glove with the strategy of violent anti-abortion terrorists.

and Benghazi (sort of)


The House Intelligence Committee has voted to declassify its report on Benghazi. Democrats on the committee claim the report concludes that there was no deliberate wrongdoing by the Obama administration. Rep. Mike Thompson says it "confirms that no one was deliberately misled, no military assets were withheld and no stand-down order (to U.S. forces) was given." Republicans are saying ... well, nothing, really.

But hey, there's another committee gearing up to re-investigate. Maybe they'll discover some reason to justify their existence.

and you also might be interested in ...


A Florida judge said two Florida congressional districts violate the state constitution. His ruling rests on an anti-gerrymandering constitutional amendment Florida voters passed in 2010, so the likelihood of this going beyond the Florida Supreme Court is small.




A commenter on last week's summary provided a link to the monthly YouTube series "Global Capitalism" by Marxist economics Professor Richard D. Wolff. (It's relevant to last week because Wolff commented on the Market Basket situation I discussed last week. Wolff gets a few of the background details wrong -- the chain has 25,000 employees, not "hundreds" -- but has some interesting thoughts about the abstract situation, beginning around the 38 minute mark.)

But here's a quote from earlier in the program, when he's talking about inequality, and about U.S.A. Today's calculation that only 1 in 8 American families have enough income to afford the American Dream:
It's really important for Americans to understand that the economic anxieties they feel and the economic difficulties they have are not about them as individuals. ... And don't [go] blaming yourself or agonizing about what you didn't do when you were a student, or courses you didn't take, or majors you didn't choose, or any of those other things. This is not about that. This is a social problem, and an economic problem, and you're just being victimized by it. And the worst thing to do if you're victimized by a social problem is to convert it into an individual problem. ... Trying to solve the economic problem that I'm describing, which is engulfing this society and others, as if you're the one who caused it and you're the one who can fix it is painful to watch. It's not going to work. It's going to make you feel terrible. And meanwhile, you're not helping to build a social movement, which is the only way you solve a social problem.



A bridal shop in Pennsylvania refused to serve a lesbian couple because "providing those two girls dresses for a sanctified marriage would break God’s law." According to ThinkProgress:
Pennsylvania is currently the only state in which same-sex couples can legally marry, but also legally be refused jobs, housing, and public services just because of their sexual orientation.

To me, this is no different from the black waitress who has to serve the guy in the Confederate-flag t-shirt. In a service economy, sometimes you have to serve people you disapprove of or resent. And the fact that other people from your church might resent the same people in the same way doesn't turn it into a religious-freedom issue.




Last week I raised the question of when to call attention to outlandish statements and when to write them off. The Alabama Republican Congressman talking about the "war on whites" ... tough call. I wish I believed the voters in his district were embarrassed by this kind of nonsense, but I doubt they are.

and let's close with something thought-provoking


I didn't realize you could photoshop video, but of course you can. In this French-language video, the singer is "beautified" while we watch.